Find Out How To Diagnose Severs Disease?

Overview

Sever’s disease (calcaneal apophysitis) is a common cause of heel pain, particularly in physically active young people who are about to begin puberty. The cause is uncertain, but it is thought that the long calf bones of the leg grow faster than the surrounding muscle and soft tissue, causing the Achilles tendon to pull uncomfortably tight.

Causes

Sever’s disease is caused by repetitive tension and/or pressure on the growth center of the heel. Running and jumping place a large amount of pressure on the heels and can cause pain. Children with Sever’s may limp or have an altered gait due to the pain. Risk factors for Sever’s include tight calf muscles, weak ankle muscles, and alignment abnormalities at the foot and ankle. Sever’s can also result from wearing shoes without sufficient heel padding or arch support.

Symptoms

On examination, the typical signs are tenderness on palpation of the heel, particularly on deep palpation at the Achilles tendon insertion. Pain on dorsiflexion of the ankle, particularly when doing active toe raises; forced dorsiflexion of the ankle is also uncomfortable. Swelling of the heel, usually mild. Calcaneal enlargement, in long-standing cases.

Diagnosis

Sever condition is diagnosed by detecting the characteristic symptoms and signs above in the older children, particularly boys between 8 and 15 years of age. Sometimes X-ray testing can be helpful as it can occasionally demonstrate irregularity of the calcaneus bone at the point where the Achilles tendon attaches.

Non Surgical Treatment

If your child have Sever’s disease, the following is suggested, cut back on sporting activities, don’t stop, just reduce the amount until symptoms improve (if the condition has been present for a while, a total break from sport may be needed later) avoid going barefoot, a soft cushioning heel raise is really important (this reduces the pull from the calf muscles on the growth plate and increases the shock absorption, so the growth plate is not knocked around as much). Stretch the calf muscles, provided the stretch does not cause pain in the area of the growth plate). The use of an ice pack after activity for 20mins is often useful for calcaneal apophysitis – this should be repeated 2 to 3 times a day.

Prevention

The best way to prevent Sever?s disease is for your child to stay flexible and stretch the hamstring, calf muscles, and the Achilles tendon before and after activity each day. It?s important to hold the stretches for 20 seconds and stretch both legs, even if there is only pain in one. If he or she only has smaller symptoms, like swelling and some tenderness, consider your child lucky. They may only have to sit out for one to two weeks during the season. The best treatment is to immediately stop the activity that caused the pain. Elevate and ice the heel for 20 minutes at a time to relieve discomfort and swelling.